Displaying posts published in

May 2018

New Harmony & Robert Owen

Chances are, you never heard of a small town – village almost – in southern Indiana, named New Harmony. The population nowadays is less than a thousand, but this small lovely town on the banks of the Wabash River was once the site of a great experiment in living and working that was to have […]

Dolores Huerta – Si Se Puede!

In 1993, Dolores Huerta became the first Latina inducted into the National Women’s Hall of Fame. She is internationally known as a labor leader and civil rights activist, and the co-founder, along with Cesar Chavez, of the United Farm Workers. As a child, Huerta remembers “going down to the beet fields in the Dakotas and […]

Ralph Waldo Emerson – Mentor of Greatness

Ralph Waldo Emerson – essayist, lecturer, and poet – was one of the leading figures of the American Renaissance of the early 1800s, which included such greats as Henry David Thoreau, Walt Whitman, Margaret Fuller, and others. During his lifetime, Emerson gave over 1500 public lectures across the United States, which were meant primarily to […]

Langston Hughes – Poet of a Great Dream of America

Poet, novelist, fiction writer, and playwright, Langston Hughes was widely known as a leader of the Harlem Renaissance, an intellectual, social, and artistic explosion that took place in New York City during the 1920s and 1930s. His family background and upbringing was complicated.  Both of his paternal great-grandmothers were African-American slaves; and both of his […]

Ralph Waldo Emerson – Leading Figure of the Early American Renaissance

Ralph Waldo Emerson, the great essayist, lecturer, and poet, was one of the leading figures of the American Renaissance of the early 1800s. He was always trying to inspire his readers and listeners to a greater vision of themselves. He had this advice for you: “Hitch your wagon to a star.” “Once you make a […]

Ruby Bridges

This lovely, six-year-old African-American girl – Ruby Bridges by name – was the pivotal person in the dismantling of the age-old white supremacy structure prevalent in American schools in the South during the 1960’s. The innocence of childhood arrayed against a monstrous behemoth of pride and prejudice. In the “Brown v. Board of Education” decision […]